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Video about pilot in Rwamagana, Rwanda

This is a great video about the pilot in Rwamagana, Rwanda by Worldfocus correspondent Martin Seemungal.

Nancie Severs and her trip to Vung Vieng Village

Imagine you are sitting on your comfy couch watching TV. You decide to tune in to 60 Minutes. They are talking about a nonprofit organization that is bringing a low-cost laptop to children in developing countries. You think that is a great idea and decide to learn more. Fast forward two years, and you are in the middle of a floating fishing village in Ha Long Bay in Northeast Vietnam. You have started a project to bring a number of these laptops to the only school in the village. While there you are tackling a variety of speed bumps that arise. These range from easy to extremely challenging. As the days pass, you can see the joy in the children and adults of the village. You realize that you have made a difference and changed their lives. You have changed their world for the better. This is the story Nancie Severs of New Hampshire relayed when she presented at OLPC's Cambridge headquarters.  Hearing Nancie speak is inspiring. She has heart and energy. Last year she visited the Vung Vieng Floating Fishing Village with her husband Mark. She thought of OLPC and realized  she could bring the XO to this village with a plan. She says if the XO laptops work out here "in the middle of the sea" where learning resources are limited, books are destroyed by the salty air, and newspapers blow away or get wet, then she will be convinced that it can work almost anywhere. Read the rest of this entry

Sridhar reports from Yirkalla, Northern Territory

[caption id="attachment_1637" align="alignnone" width="450" caption="The screen's so bright, they've gotta wear shades"]The screen's so bright, they've gotta wear shades[/caption] From OLPC Australia, Sridhar Dhanapalan reports on Read the rest of this entry

Kasiisi Project: Notes from a technical lead

“I like to use the computers for English and to know about them” says Daphine of Kasiisi Primary School in rural western Uganda.
The Kasiisi Project helps to promote conservation through education around Kibale National Park, Uganda by building classrooms, hiring extra teachers, supporting healthy environments, providing support for 90 students to attend Secondary School, and working with other school support organizations.  Over the past 15 years, Kasiisi has grown from a small, one-building school to a massive compound with a kitchen, library, teacher housing, and now computer classes. Much of the early success of Kasiisi can be associated with a strong Head Mistress and support from the Kasiisi Project. My name is Jeff Bittner, and I have been working for the Kasiisi Project since October 2008 helping to support Kasiisi and the 4 other schools in the Project. I have been involved with a variety of activities since my arrival, including the introduction and implementation of roughly 150 XOs (see our Kasiisi blog for more background). As a person working in the schools before, during, and after the introduction of the XO Laptops, I have seen the way that these computers can excite and engage the students, as well as the complications that come with them. Read the rest of this entry

OLPC in El Salvador

[caption id="attachment_1923" align="alignnone" width="180" caption="Teachers and assistants at the Universidad Evangélica de El Salvador"]Teachers and assistants at the Universidad Evangélica de El Salvador[/caption]
El Salvador, which began a 400 XO pilot Read the rest of this entry

OLPC Afghanistan recap

Part of an ongoing series on OLPC in Afghanistan.

Since 2008, we have worked with the Afghan Ministry of Education to build capacity for OLPC in Afghanistan. The initial pilots over the past year have been with 4th-6th grade students, in MOE schools and community-based education groups.

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A time to learn

In early May, Save the Children's State of the World’s Mothers 2010 report ranked Afghanistan last among the 160 countries surveyed, in terms of how easy it was to raise children. While medical care is often limited, and being an infant in Afghanistan poses many risks, it is also a tough place to grow up. Only 52% of primary aged school children are enrolled in school, where classes are often made up of more than fifty students.Read the rest of this entry